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VOLUME 3 , ISSUE 3 ( September-December, 2012 ) > List of Articles

RESEARCH ARTICLE

The Hierarchy of Oral Cancer in India

Naik Balachandra Ramachandra

Citation Information : Ramachandra NB. The Hierarchy of Oral Cancer in India. Int J Head Neck Surg 2012; 3 (3):143-146.

DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10001-1115

Published Online: 00-12-2012

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2012; Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.


Abstract

Background

India constitutes more than 80% of population from the villages and are not only socially and economically deprived but also do not get medical facilities compared to small towns and cities. Newspaper says India is fastest developing country, but, in respect to medical service to her citizens at rural level, it is nil. Now, oral cavity cancer is 3rd commonest cancer, which is seen commonly in village people in both sexes. We reviewed the past studies on oral cancer and the same is compared with the present trend.

Oral cancer biopsies secured 29.54% among all malignant biopsies. Male to female ratio is 1:1. Majority of patients (38.5%) got oral cancer in 4th decade, followed by 35.2% patients in 3rd decade. Buccal mucosa (57.5%) was the commonest site, followed by tongue (24.2%). Gutkha (the smokeless tobacco) is commonest cause for this cancer.

Conclusion

Apart from chewing habits, illiteracy, poverty, low caloric diet and nonavailability of free medical facility is the cause for rise in oral cancer incidences.

How to cite this article

Ramachandra NB. The Hierarchy of Oral Cancer in India. Int J Head and Neck Surg 2012;3(3):143-146.


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