International Journal of Head and Neck Surgery

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VOLUME 12 , ISSUE 1 ( January-March, 2021 ) > List of Articles

CASE REPORT

Cervical Transverse Mega-apophysis: A Rare Cause of Plexopathy

Pierre Ferrer, Ana S Álvarez, Juan R Penanes

Keywords : Plexopathy, Spine, Transverse mega-apophysis,Cervical

Citation Information : Ferrer P, Álvarez AS, Penanes JR. Cervical Transverse Mega-apophysis: A Rare Cause of Plexopathy. Int J Head Neck Surg 2021; 12 (1):40-42.

DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10001-1418

License: CC BY-NC 4.0

Published Online: 31-03-2021

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2021; Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.


Abstract

Aim: This article aims to describe the case of a 43-year-old male with a neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome caused by a C7 transverse mega-apophysis. Background: Cervical transverse mega-apophysis, transverse apophysomegaly, or elongation of the transverse vertebral process represents a variation of normal skeletal anatomy. This variation has been little studied and its prevalence in the population is unknown because it often exists without symptoms. It is estimated that less than 10% of cases are symptomatic. Case description: We present a rare case of a man with a neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (in this case, a left plexopathy) caused by a cervical transverse mega-apophysis. After surgical intervention, the patient improved and after a 1-year follow-up, he remained asymptomatic. Conclusion: Even though some authors describe cervical pain associated with this condition, we found very few data regarding plexopathy or other neurological symptoms caused by a cervical transverse apophysomegaly.


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